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Living With Fibromyalgia - Online Support Group

What's Next in the Journey?

#1

I recently took a trip with my 10 year old daughter. Like most kids, the phrase "are we there yet?" came up more than once. This got me thinking about my life's journey and "what's next." Life with FMS is unpredictable but that doesn't mean I am going to stop setting goals and working toward them. I will keep moving forward and not dwell on the things I can't do or that are physically difficult to do. I will focus on the positives and take it one day, one minute at a time. I won't be worried about the past because it just takes away from the present moment. I will focus on taking steps to keep symptoms as manageable as they can be. I will continue to appreciate good days. I will listen to others with an open mind, even the doctors :-). I am striving to step out of my comfort zone and grow as a person. I am not going to let FMS run my life. I am in charge of my journey and I am thankful for that.

What is next in your life's journey?

#2

Hi Auburnm,

I have been off the board for awhile. But when I was on before I responded pretty often.

I always shared that I have a lot of faith and that is what gets me thru each day. So I think your positive attitude when dealing with this disease we share is awesome.

You thoughts are my thoughts every day. I believe our attitude makes all the difference in the world. I have probably shared this before on here but I can honestly say that I have

Asked why me? I just say "what's next?"

So hang in there, we all need to hang in there together!

Jackie S (Donna)

#3

Being new to the group I am realizing how isolated I had become. Just visiting this site brings tears to my eyes. I have been so busy trying to survive, I forgot to mourn.

#4

What's next for me is pushing myself to go to the gym at least three times per week. I just joined last week. I am working to some lifestyle changes that I hope will lead to some autoimmune changes. Yay!

#5

Just coming out of a nasty flare. I’m in phoenix right now helping my daughter while she goes in for her c section. When i get bacik home i plan to get back into p.t.and play with my horse. Starting back very slowly of course

#6

For my next trick ... !

I'm attending a 'Rehabilitation Day Unit' at my local hospital on the Monday after this post. This first attendance is as an introduction and for general assesment before further attendance. The main reason for attendance is to access exercise / gym routines and motivation exercises. I was contacted by the day unit [staff] after my neurologist* recomended me to it and it to me! I hope to attend the day unit on a regular basis and to make good use of the facilities therein.

I agree that a positive attitude can be very helpful for those with FMS or other health conditions.

*I visit neurology yearly in relation to my ataxia but the team is aware of my FM[S] and offers advice and help relating to both as well as monitoring my health condition in general.

#7

What's next? Good question, Auburnm, thanks for making me think about it. I've been too long just coping - with autoimmune diseases, other medical issues, the death of my husband (3 years ago), and, of course, fibromyalgia.

Now that I'm on a regimen of Lyrica and Cymbalta (yes, both) I'm starting to feel almost human again. Not enough to go back to work ;-} (medical issues forced me into retirement 8 years ago) but enough to start thinking about doing more with friends, family, and volunteering.

I guess I'm not ready to answer your question, but at least I'm ready to think about it!

#8

I agree with you Auburnm. I am trying to work my bucket list (don't take this wrong...fibro won't kill me, but I'm 60 and need to do what I can while I can). So I've challenged myself this year, and even though it took help (sometimes from strangers), I've come home alive. I am so thankful for the challenges, and also for the knowledge of my limitations. We will survive, one day at a time. And some day there will be a cure.

#9

My friend a year ago asked me to help her. Her husband had to have surgery on his neck and she had no babysitter. I did not tell her I was on disability as she did not ask me to work 40 hours, only a few hours in the early am. So, I did. Then she decided to separate from him after his recovery so again, I said I would help. I was doing early mornings but once kids were all off to school I could nap. She needed help in the afternoon. After a few weeks I was exhausted and went into flares. She was able to work it out she could alternate my weeks. All these months she has really asked that I get to bed early enough to get up early. I discovered that having a tight regimented sleep pattern helped me focus my energy. Having a week where I could sleep in helped and then having a week where I operated like a normal person has really made my life more enjoyable. Her husband returned and now I have days where I can accomplish things. I am having an easier time cleaning my house, doing activities with my son and my friend and relatives. I could not be happier. What's ahead? I can finally clear out the clutter in my house and make a man cave for my tween son

#10

Thanks for the idea, LucyJane. I also am in my 60's, and a widow. I abandoned my bucket list when my FM diagnosis came shortly before my husband died. It's time to go back and see what I can do now with the help of family, friends, and strangers.


LucyJane said:

I am trying to work my bucket list (don't take this wrong...fibro won't kill me, but I'm 60 and need to do what I can while I can). So I've challenged myself this year, and even though it took help (sometimes from strangers), I've come home alive. I am so thankful for the challenges, and also for the knowledge of my limitations. We will survive, one day at a time. And some day there will be a cure.