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Living With Fibromyalgia - Online Support Group

Success Stories

#1

I am new to this group and am very interested in hearing success stories. Even if the success may seem small, please share because what worked for you may work for someone else too!

#2

Hi Ticklefrom, this is a great topic for Positive Pick-Me-Ups, thanks for posting! For me, I consider every day a success. I was diagnosed with Fibro in 1998 and I had a few rough years physically and emotionally. Finally something just clicked in my head that I needed to try a more positive approach. It isn't easy but thru diligent practice I am much happier / positive and this really helps with Fibro symptom management. I use a variety of tools to help. Deep breathing, mindfulness, hot baths with Epsom salt, physical therapy exercises, drink lots of water to stay hydrated (helps with Fibro fog as well). I also try to do gentle swimming during warm weather and I walk (slow, but hey anything is better than nothing). I work full time which sometimes is a struggle but it also helps me - by staying busy I can focus on others and it is a distraction from the FMS symptoms. I will be interested to see what others say. Hugs!!

#3

Thanks Auburnm, great response. Looking forward to more as well!

#4

Hello,

I love hot baths. I run the water as hot as I can tolerate at a comfortable temperature. The hot water relaxes my muscles and has this effect on my nerves that seems to distract them from sensing pain. All my nerves can sense is the warm, relaxing feeling of the water. Lighting a candle instead of using the bathroom light really dims the room and gives my eyes a break from the harsh lights. I have been taking hot baths since before I was diagnosed to help with the pain and it is the only treatment that has been consistently effective for temporary relief 100% of the time. On mornings when I was still suffering from Chronic Fatige to the extreme, I would get up early and take a bath before going to work. It helped wake me up, yet relax me and set a good tone for the day. It would even help my fatigue : )

Talk soon,

Sara

#5

Thanks for sharing Sara!

#6

There is something about serotonin that makes me feel normal. I will explain. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that improves mood, sleep, reactions to stress and a million other things. My best and most amazing days came when my serotonin got a boost. The day after I started cymbalta, I had so little pain that I wanted to go back to work and I wondered why I was on disability. It was amazing and gave me hope. The same thing happened when I increased the dose. Unfortunately, these “highs” in mu serotonin dd not last, but when I started Elavil - I had an entire week of NO pain! I drove myself to my parents and back, a total of 2 hours. I walked around a mall for hours. I felt so normal and I cherished it. I will always encourage people to at least try medications in order to get that bit of relief. Both of those medications increase serotonin, as does 5-HTP, but due to interactions I recommend talking to your doctor.

Great topic! - Heather

#7

Hi, Tickle.

Thanks so much for posting this pick-me-up.

The success of others sharing in the same struggle can certainly inspire us.

I’d like to share not my success in treatment, but my success in deepening as a person. I have learned how to appreciate my time alive by being present now… celebrating small victories, taking it a moment at a time and weathering any failures. I, honestly, have Fibro to thank for waking me up to life. I used to always be so preoccupied with the future. I, certainly, am not suggesting I am glad to have this terrible disorder, but I am able to appreciate it has left me both stronger in spirit and wiser in soul.

Hugs,

Laurie

#8

Heather and Laurie,

Thank you both for sharing your stories. This is the exact dialogue I was hoping to see. I am so new to this, so your responses give me hope!

Lisa

#9

Hi Laurie,

I feel the same way myself. I used to measure my days and worth by how much I accomplished. To the point where I lost track of priorities. And probably had a false sense of myself. I was always the one in charge etc. I have been known to say that Fibro has been a gift. It has taught me what is really important, realigned my priorities and strengthen my faith. I have to depend on others (that was a hard one), ask for help (even harder) and be satisfied with any accomplishment I was able to complete at the end of the day. Sometimes it was as simple as changing the bed! It has taken me years to reach this point of acceptance and some days I still get discouraged. But not for long. I have surrounded myself with people who care about me and understand my good days and my bad days. I have been blessed with The Best Husband in the World and I make sure I tell him often lol Good friends make a huge difference. And I have learned to say No Thank You without any other explanation. Those who know you and care about you understand, those you don't - won't. God is good. Hugs, Paula

BaltimoreBaby said:

Hi, Tickle.
Thanks so much for posting this pick-me-up.
The success of others sharing in the same struggle can certainly inspire us.
I'd like to share not my success in treatment, but my success in deepening as a person. I have learned how to appreciate my time alive by being present now... celebrating small victories, taking it a moment at a time and weathering any failures. I, honestly, have Fibro to thank for waking me up to life. I used to always be so preoccupied with the future. I, certainly, am not suggesting I am glad to have this terrible disorder, but I am able to appreciate it has left me both stronger in spirit and wiser in soul.
Hugs,
Laurie
#10

Thank you for sharing your personal story Paula, I really appreciate you take the time.

#11

I was diagnosed Oct 29, 2014. I have been in pain since the end of June, when I had a bicycle accident. Somebody hit me from behind. I landed on a concrete curb on my ribs, NOT GOOD. I'm still somewhat new to this. Some things that have really helped me are as follows. I have an excellent rheumy who has done EVERYTHING in his power to help me. His nurse, Angie, has been FABULOUS!!! Another thing, when I wake up (always in pain), I stretch SLOWLY in bed (yoga - pilates type stretches) and start moving around before I get up. That has helped. I also try to workout 10-15 minutes 2-3 times a day. It has helped as long as I don't overdo it. The other thing that has helped ALOT is the support, tips, ideas and all the caring people on here!! Hope this helps!! Thank you so much to all of you!!!

#12

I was diagnosed in 2008, just after getting a BBA in Accounting. My symptoms have gradually (and at times, not so gradually) gotten worse and my ability to do/think/feel has diminished. My understanding of FMS has increased and my ability to allow myself to hurt has become a necessity.

My success is not in a reduction in symptoms. My success is in finding myself beneath all of the symptoms, drugs, social isolation. My success is in not allowing FMS to run my life, even though it does, at times, run my mind and body. I have FMS; it doesn't have me.

#13

Hi Moe, thank you for sharing your personal story! I can really related to your l sentence "My success is in finding myself beneath all of the symptoms, drugs, social isolation." This is what I am trying to do.

Moe said:

I was diagnosed in 2008, just after getting a BBA in Accounting. My symptoms have gradually (and at times, not so gradually) gotten worse and my ability to do/think/feel has diminished. My understanding of FMS has increased and my ability to allow myself to hurt has become a necessity.

My success is not in a reduction in symptoms. My success is in finding myself beneath all of the symptoms, drugs, social isolation. My success is in not allowing FMS to run my life, even though it does, at times, run my mind and body. I have FMS; it doesn't have me.

#14

Thanks Woolybear, for sharing your story. You're very fortunate to have such good people and doctors supporting you through this. Have a great day my friend!

woolybear said:

I was diagnosed Oct 29, 2014. I have been in pain since the end of June, when I had a bicycle accident. Somebody hit me from behind. I landed on a concrete curb on my ribs, NOT GOOD. I'm still somewhat new to this. Some things that have really helped me are as follows. I have an excellent rheumy who has done EVERYTHING in his power to help me. His nurse, Angie, has been FABULOUS!!! Another thing, when I wake up (always in pain), I stretch SLOWLY in bed (yoga - pilates type stretches) and start moving around before I get up. That has helped. I also try to workout 10-15 minutes 2-3 times a day. It has helped as long as I don't overdo it. The other thing that has helped ALOT is the support, tips, ideas and all the caring people on here!! Hope this helps!! Thank you so much to all of you!!!

#15

After having been diagnosed with fibromyalgia back in Nov 2011, my whole world was changed. Household tasks were troublesome and finding the right treatments were discouraging. Nowadays, I work 35 hours a week as a preschool assistant teacher, on a regimen of Cymbalta, Tramadol and Cyclobenzaprine. I still hurt all over, but working greatly helps. I've also met two other co workers whose siblings suffer from fibromyalgia. To me, this is a success in my life, for now, for however long I can manage working. God bless all of you in your journey.

#16

I consider myself to be a success story. I work full time teaching seventh graders history and then I go home at night to my 3 beautiful boys (DD grew up and moved out...darn her) and my hubby . They're a lot of work too :) But each and every night, as I (struggle to) fall asleep, I can feel the little hands of my five year old stroking my hair and him snuggling against me and I am amazed at how truly blessed I am! I have a home, a job and a family I love. My career is challenging...my family is challenging but I've never been one to say "oooo...that's too hard!" I do my best each day and if I'm in pain, well, pain can go suck an egg!

#17


Spirit is a good name for you.. you have lots of it! You seem very motivated to keep things moving. I really appreciate you sharing your story. I am struggling with work right now and my diagnosis is recent. Thanks for the encouragement.


spirit1 said:

After having been diagnosed with fibromyalgia back in Nov 2011, my whole world was changed. Household tasks were troublesome and finding the right treatments were discouraging. Nowadays, I work 35 hours a week as a preschool assistant teacher, on a regimen of Cymbalta, Tramadol and Cyclobenzaprine. I still hurt all over, but working greatly helps. I've also met two other co workers whose siblings suffer from fibromyalgia. To me, this is a success in my life, for now, for however long I can manage working. God bless all of you in your journey.

#18


Hey Lily,

It seems that your family and job motivate you to keep pushing forward. Keep sharing your story and successes in chat too, I know it lifts peoples spirits and inspires then to keep moving!.


lilybit said:

I consider myself to be a success story. I work full time teaching seventh graders history and then I go home at night to my 3 beautiful boys (DD grew up and moved out...darn her) and my hubby . They're a lot of work too :) But each and every night, as I (struggle to) fall asleep, I can feel the little hands of my five year old stroking my hair and him snuggling against me and I am amazed at how truly blessed I am! I have a home, a job and a family I love. My career is challenging...my family is challenging but I've never been one to say "oooo...that's too hard!" I do my best each day and if I'm in pain, well, pain can go suck an egg!

#19

Hello,
I was diagnosed in October. It took 8 long years to get an answer . I found a great sense of freedom and validation in this diagnosis. Of course I would never choose this but it has and is teaching me so very much! I’m learning to be real with myself. To say no when I need to. To cherish the little things in life and to love with all I have. I am incredibly blessed with an amazing family and also so thankful for this group. I hope you will find the comfort and hope here that I do.
Have a beautiful day!
Dyana

#20

You're welcome, Tickle

. Thanks for this post. We all need to hear success stories more often!

Hugs,
Laurie

Ticklefrom said:

Heather and Laurie,

Thank you both for sharing your stories. This is the exact dialogue I was hoping to see. I am so new to this, so your responses give me hope!

Lisa